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Curriculum

Curriculum Intent

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Our aim is that all pupils will flourish to become knowledge rich learners, using all that the outdoor learning environment has to offer and to develop as model citizens of the future.  Whilst embedding reading skills and vocabulary mastery throughout the ambitious curriculum, our mission is to enhance understanding and apply knowledge to real life whilst gaining cultural capital.  We do this through providing education of the highest quality within a happy, secure and Christian setting whilst embracing and celebrating diversity.

Our ambitious curriculum comprises all the learning and other experiences that Christopher Reeves Church of England Primary School provides to its pupils. It provides opportunities for all pupils to learn and achieve, to develop their understanding of the spiritual, moral, cultural and artistic aspects of life and to prepare for their continued education.  Using and developing the Restorative Practice model throughout the school, all pupils understand their place and value and are able to thrive in a supportive and challenging educational establishment.

Our Curriculum Aims

  • Provide an ambitious, knowledge rich curriculum to promote the creative, intellectual, cultural, spiritual, moral and physical development of all students;
  • Enabling every individual to flourish; achieving their fullest personal and academic potential;
  • Ensure pupils leave with the skills and knowledge to be able to access their next stage in learning;
  • Provide a broad, enjoyable and inspiring curriculum with emphasis on building good relationships and become caring citizens who are able to live and work with others;
  • Provide a curriculum which promotes physical and mental wellbeing as well as the love of the outdoors;
  • Provide pupils with opportunities to make a positive contribution to each other, the school, and the wider community through adopting the restorative practice model
  • Achieve high standards across the curriculum;
  • Give pupils an understanding of religious and moral values;
  • To respect other races, beliefs and ways of life;

Implementation

We aim to teach our curriculum in an engaging, interesting and inspirational way primarily through a knowledge and skills-based approach. Our key aim is for all pupils to leave Christopher Reeves Primary School knowing more and remembering more, setting them up for their future education.

Curriculum themes are structured around core texts studied through the English curriculum; care is taken to provide the pupils with a rich language based, high quality range of texts.  These themes cover most subjects; excluding Mathematics, PSHE, PE, MFL and Religious Education, which have their own schemes. Where possible, however, links are made to embed the learning in these subjects to ensure pupils make links within their learning i.e pupils can write a non-chronological report about volcanoes they have learnt about in their geography lesson or can formulate graphs based on the results taken in a science lesson.

Our pupils lie at the heart of this thematic learning and play a part, where possible, in planning what they would like to learn as well. This approach provides a rich diversity of exciting themes that appeal to our pupils while still covering all the separate elements required by our Early Years and National Curriculum.

We are passionate about providing pupils with opportunities to apply their knowledge and understanding of the curriculum and we offer a range of trips and visits to complement their learning in school. Our Visits Plan offers pupils opportunities to develop and explore the local area as well as visiting places of interest further afield. We provide a number of residential visits which are exciting, varied and a fantastic opportunity for relationship building.  In addition to this we provide opportunities for in-school enrichment days such as Forest School, allowing pupils to take part in new experiences to enhance their knowledge and understanding of the wider world.

Impact

A clear assessment schedule is in place throughout the school using end of key stage expectations.  Assessments are carried out at the end of each term for core subjects and half term for non-core subjects to inform leaders and teachers of the overarching attainment and progress that is being made by pupils demonstrating that they have learnt and remembered the content of the subject.

A significant amount of intervention and support occurs across all Key Stages. This includes subject-based planned differentiation, one-to-one sessions, small group intervention, after school support and booster sessions.  All interventions are carefully planned and meet individual pupils’ next steps. 

Reading skills are taught rigorously throughout the school starting with phonics in the Reception class.  Reading is prioritised to ensure that pupils are able to access the full curriculum offer through regular one to one reading with adults in school, guided reading and cross curricular reading comprehension.

Each subject has its own curriculum intent.  Please see these below:

English

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

At Christopher Reeves primary school we believe that a quality English curriculum should develop pupil’s love of reading, writing and discussion. We have a rigorous and well organised English curriculum that provides many purposeful opportunities for reading, writing and discussion. Our curriculum closely follows the aims of the National Curriculum for English 2014 to enable all children to:

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary and an understanding of grammar which can be applied successfully to a variety of different genres and text types.
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

These aims are embedded across our English lessons and the wider curriculum. We will provide the means for pupils to develop a secure knowledge and understanding, which follows a clear pathway of progression as they advance through the primary curriculum. Rigorous assessment and review will ensure that we are able to provide targeted support so that all pupils experience success; we believe that having secure English skills is crucial to a high quality education and will give our pupils the tools they need to participate fully as a member of society.

Implementation

Early reading is supported through the Letters and Sounds phonics scheme. Regular training and development days ensure that staff are equipped to teach with the expertise and skills required to promote excellent progress, as well as a love of reading. Through guided reading sessions in years 1-6, pupils develop deeper reading skills through discussion of content and acquisition of new vocabulary. Guided reading also provides pupils with the opportunity to experience reading a wide variety of books: different cultures, narrative genres; a range of authors. Each class’s timetable is organised to enable weekly access to the library, with a selection of books that provide quality fiction and non-fiction reading material for all pupils to promote reading for enjoyment. Books are also read to the pupils regularly to model decoding, reading with expression and promote a love of reading.

At Christopher Reeves Primary School, teachers follow The Write Stuff planning and make links to other areas of the curriculum to ensure that cross curricular links provide further context for learning. Teaching blocks focus on fiction, non-fiction or poetry, in line with the 2014 National Curriculum and comprehension, grammar, spelling and writing are embedded in lessons. Lesson sequences build progressively towards an extended piece of writing. Handwriting is also taught within English lessons and in UKS2 the pupils are able to use a pen to enhance their writing further.

To enrich the English curriculum, World Book Day is celebrated annually with pupils dressing up as a book character and reading, writing and discussion activities are planned for the pupils to enjoy. The outdoor learning environment, including the spiritual garden, provides a safe and quiet place to read which helps to promote pupil’s wellbeing and also provides a stimulus for writing through drama and exploration.

Assessment for Learning is embedded in English lessons and pupils are active in reviewing the successes in their work and identifying, with support from their teacher, areas for development to ensure a continuous and individualised approach to improving their work.

Impact

The rigorous and well organised English curriculum, has resulted in a community of enthusiastic readers and writers who enjoy showcasing their developing knowledge and skills. Pupils are confident to take risks in their reading and writing, and love to discuss and share their ideas. Outcomes of work in both English and topic books evidence the high quality of work and the impact of varied and cross curricular writing opportunities. These enable pupils to write across a range of forms and adapt their writing successfully, considering the purpose.

Maths

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

The 2014 National Curriculum for Maths aims to ensure that all children:

  • Become fluent in the fundamentals of Mathematics
  • Are able to reason mathematically
  • Can solve problems by applying their Mathematics

At Christopher Reeves Primary School, these skills are embedded within Maths lessons and developed consistently over time. We are committed to ensuring that children are able to recognise the importance of Maths in the wider world and that they are also able to use their mathematical skills and knowledge confidently in their lives in a range of different contexts. We want all children to enjoy Mathematics and to experience success in the subject, with the ability to reason mathematically.

Implementation

At Christopher Reeves teachers use a range of methods and styles of teaching to engage learners and to make maths fun and accessible for all. They do this by:

  • Reinforcing the expectation that all children are capable of achieving high standards in mathematics.
  • Having a carefully designed curriculum which suits our mixed age classes.
  • Having well planned lessons that aim to foster deep conceptual and procedural knowledge.
  • Ensuring differentiation is effective and achieved by emphasising deep knowledge and through individual support and intervention.
  • Providing daily opportunities to practice, consolidate and build mathematical fluency and understanding of mathematical concepts.
  • Using precise questioning in class to test knowledge and assess children to identify those requiring intervention.
  • Ensuring maths equipment and resources are up to date and used effectively to support learning.

To ensure whole school consistency and progression, the school bases it’s teaching on the White Rose Maths scheme and uses resources and guidance from the NCETM and Number Sense Scheme.

Children are encouraged to solve problems each day through the use of concrete resources, pictorial representations and abstract thinking (the C-P-A approach). This helps children tackle concepts in a tangible and more comfortable way. Whenever possible maths can be taken outside and our natural resources and outdoor area can be used. Foundation stage and KS1 use their outdoor areas to enable children to practise and consolidate learning in a more ‘real life’ or first-hand way on a regular basisi.
 

Maths topics are taught in blocks, to enable the achievement of ‘mastery’ over time. Each lesson phase provides the opportunity to achieve greater depth, with children who are quick to grasp new content, being offered more tricky and sophisticated problems, as well as exploratory, investigative tasks, within the lesson as appropriate.

Impact

Our approach supports the children in developing their collaborative and independent skills, as well as empathy and the need to recognise the achievement of others. The children are confident in their abilities and express their enjoyment of mathematics. The children use their mathematical knowledge in other areas of the curriculum.

 

Regular and ongoing assessment informs teaching, as well as intervention, to support and enable the success of each child. These factors ensure that we aspire to achieve high standards, and help all children to reach their potential.

Science

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

The 2014 national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific skills required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future. We understand that it is important for lessons to have a skills-based focus, and that the knowledge can be taught through this

At Christopher Reeves Primary, we encourage children to be inquisitive throughout their time at the school and beyond. The science curriculum fosters a healthy curiosity in children about our universe and promotes respect for the living and non-living. We believe science encompasses the acquisition of knowledge, concepts, skills and positive attitudes. Throughout the programmes of study, the children will acquire and develop the key knowledge that has been identified within each unit and across each year group. The key knowledge identified by each year group is informed by the national curriculum and builds towards identified phase ‘end points’ in accordance with NC expectations. Key skills are also mapped for each year group and are progressive throughout the school. These too ensure systematic progression to identified skills end points which are in accordance with the Working Scientifically skills expectations of the national curriculum. The curriculum is designed to ensure that children are able to acquire key scientific knowledge through practical experiences; using equipment, conducting experiments, building arguments and explaining concepts confidently. The school’s approach to science takes account of the school’s own context, wherever possible making use of the school’s extensive grounds and outdoor learning environment.  Cross curricular opportunities are also identified, mapped and planned to ensure contextual relevance. Children are encouraged to ask questions and be curious about their surroundings and a love of science is nurtured through a whole school ethos and a varied science curriculum.

Implementation

Teachers create a supportive and challenging environment within their classrooms and reinforce an expectation that all pupils are capable of achieving high standards in science. Our whole school approach to the teaching and learning of science involves the following;

  • Science will be taught in topic blocks by the class teacher. This is a strategy to enable the achievement of a greater depth of knowledge.  Links to other curriculum areas are made, including considering spiritual, moral, cultural and artistic links where appropriate.
  • Existing knowledge is checked at the beginning of each topic, as part of the KWL strategy (What I know, What I would like to Know and What I have Learned). This ensures that teaching is informed by the children’s starting points and that it takes account of pupil voice, incorporating children’s interests.
  • Key vocabulary is identified at the beginning of the topic, displayed in the classroom and regularly referred to in subsequent lessons to embrace our vocabulary mastery approach.
  • Through our planning, we involve practical activities that allow children to apply their knowledge, and develop the disciplinary knowledge of working scientifically. Children are encouraged to ask their own questions and be given opportunities to use their scientific and research skills. This curiosity is celebrated within the classroom. In addition, teacher demonstrations are used alongside high quality discussion to enhance pupils understanding of key concepts.  Planning involves teachers creating engaging lessons, often involving high-quality resources to aid understanding of conceptual knowledge. Teachers use precise questioning in class to test conceptual knowledge and skills, and assess pupils regularly to identify those children with gaps in learning, so that all pupils keep up. Tasks are selected and designed to provide appropriate challenge to all learners, in line with the school’s commitment to inclusion.
  • We build upon the knowledge and skill development of the previous years. As the children’s knowledge and understanding increases, they become more proficient in selecting, using scientific equipment, collating and interpreting results, they become increasingly confident in their growing ability to come to conclusions based on real evidence.
  • Working Scientifically skills are embedded into lessons to ensure that skills are systematically developed throughout the children’s school career and new vocabulary and challenging concepts are introduced through direct teaching. This is developed through the years, in-keeping with the topics.
  • Teachers demonstrate how to use scientific equipment, and the various Working Scientifically skills in order to embed scientific understanding. Teachers find opportunities to develop children’s understanding of their surroundings by accessing outdoor learning and workshops with experts.
  • Children are offered a wide range of extra-curricular activities, visits, trips and visitors to complement and broaden the curriculum. These are purposeful and link with the knowledge being taught in class.
  • Regular events, such as Science Week and Forest School, allow all pupils to come off-timetable, to provide broader provision and the acquisition and application of knowledge and skills.
  • At the end of each topic, key knowledge is reviewed by the children and rigorously checked by the teacher and consolidated as necessary.

Impact

The successful approach at Christopher Reeves School results in a fun, engaging, high-quality science education, that provides children with the foundations and knowledge for understanding the world. Our engagement with the local environment ensures that children learn through varied and first hand experiences of the world around them. Frequent, continuous and progressive learning outside the classroom is embedded throughout the science curriculum. Through various workshops, visits by experts and trips, children have the understanding that science has changed our lives and that it is vital to the world’s future prosperity. Children learn the possibilities for careers in science as part of our Science week and with links to local science based firms such as Unilever. From this exposure to a range of different scientists from various backgrounds, all children feel they are scientists and capable of achieving. Children at Christopher Reeves Primary overwhelmingly enjoy science and this results in motivated learners with sound scientific understanding.

Religious Education

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Children’s vocabulary and life experiences

Empower – Children to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

The Church of England’s Vision for Education leads our whole school curriculum intent: Living Our Values, which is deeply Christian with the promise by Jesus of “life in all its fullness” at its heart. This is achieved through an ambitious curriculum, which promotes the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of children whilst giving pupils opportunity to enhance their understanding, apply their knowledge to real life experiences particularly using the great outdoors.

The intent of teaching Religious Education at Christopher Reeves, is to support and challenge pupils to reflect upon, develop and affirm their own beliefs, values and attitudes and those of others through an exploration of shared human experience and to understand the place and significance of religion in the contemporary world.

Our scheme of work is in accordance with the Bedford Borough, Central Bedfordshire and Luton Agreed Syllabus alongside the programme, ‘Understanding Christianity,’ which progressively builds their understanding of significant theological concepts within Christianity with their own self-understanding and understanding of the world as part of their wider religious literacy.

Implementation

The Implementation of the School’s programme of study for RE is in accordance with ‘The Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education in Bedford Borough, Central Bedfordshire and Luton 2018.’

All religions and their communities are treated with respect and sensitivity and we value the links that can be made between home, school and the local community and beyond. We acknowledge that each religion studied can contribute to the education of all our pupils. We promote teaching in Religious Education that stresses open enquiry and first-hand experiences wherever possible for both staff and pupils.

Our Religious Education curriculum is high quality, well thought out and is planned to demonstrate progression. The syllabus is implemented in school through a knowledge and skills-based approach, where children build their knowledge of a range of religions and gain an understanding of religions in the wider world. Work in Religious Education builds on the pupils’ own experiences and uses contemporary issues to stimulate discussion. Reflection on learning is a key aspect to each RE lesson and we build in spirituality, encouraging pupils to think deeply.

Impact

Religious Education provokes challenging questions about the ultimate meaning and purpose of life, beliefs about God, the self and the nature of reality, issues of right and wrong and what it means to be human. It develops pupils’ knowledge and understanding of Christianity, other principal religions, other religious traditions and other world views that offer answers to questions such as these. It offers opportunities for personal reflection and spiritual development. It enhances pupils’ awareness and understanding of religions and beliefs, teachings, practices and forms of expression, as well as of the influence of religion on individuals, families, communities and cultures.

Religious Education encourages pupils to learn from different religions, beliefs, values and traditions while exploring their own beliefs and questions of meaning. It challenges pupils to reflect on, consider, analyse, interpret and evaluate issues of truth, belief, faith and ethics and to communicate their responses.

The importance of Religious Education is that it encourages pupils to develop their sense of identity and belonging. It enables them to flourish individually within their communities and as citizens in a pluralistic society and global community. Religious Education has an important role in preparing pupils for adult life, employment and lifelong learning. It enables pupils to develop respect for and sensitivity to others, in particular those whose faiths and beliefs are different from their own. It promotes discernment and enables pupils to combat prejudice.

Computing

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

In line with the 2014 National Curriculum for Computing, our aim is to provide a high-quality computing education which equips children to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. The curriculum will teach children key knowledge about how computers and computer systems work, and how they are designed and programmed. Learners will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of computational systems of all kinds, whether or not they include computers.
By the time they leave Christopher Reeves Primary, children will have gained key knowledge and skills in the three main areas of the computing curriculum:

  • computer science (programming and understanding how digital systems work),
  • information technology (using computer systems to store, retrieve and send information)
  • digital literacy (evaluating digital content and using technology safely and respectfully).

The objectives within each strand support the development of learning across the key stages, ensuring a solid grounding for future learning and beyond.

Implementation

At Christopher Reeves Primary, computing is taught using a blocked approach. This ensures children are able to develop depth in their knowledge and skills over the duration of each of their computing topics. Teachers use the ‘Teach Computing’ curriculum units as a starting point for the planning of their computing lessons, which are often linked to engaging contexts in other subjects and topics. Knowledge and skills are mapped across each topic and year group to ensure systematic progression. In addition, Project Evolve is used to support the teaching of Internet Safety.  Internet Safety is taught in specific lessons, as part of lessons on other aspects of computing and as a focus in an Internet Safety week.

We have a class set of chrome books, some laptops and ipads to ensure that all year groups have the opportunity to use a range of devices and programs for many purposes across the wider curriculum, as well as in discrete computing lessons. Employing cross-curricular links motivates pupils and supports them to make connections and remember the steps they have been taught.
The implementation of the curriculum also ensures a balanced coverage of computer science, information technology and digital literacy. The children will have experiences of all three strands in each year group, but the subject knowledge imparted becomes increasingly specific and in depth, with more complex skills being taught, thus ensuring that learning is built upon. For example, children in Key Stage 1 learn what algorithms are, which leads them to the design stage of programming in Key Stage 2, where they design, write and debug programs, explaining the thinking behind their algorithms.

Impact

Our approach to the curriculum results in a fun, engaging, and high-quality computing education. Assessment opportunities include formative assessment in each lesson to ensure that misconceptions are recognised and addressed if they occur. Summative assessment is used at the end of each block of work which is used to feed into teachers’ future planning. Much of the subject-specific knowledge developed in our computing lessons equip pupils with experiences which will benefit them in secondary school, further education and future workplaces. From research methods, use of presentation and creative tools and critical thinking, computing at Christopher Reeves Primary gives pupils the building blocks that enable them to pursue a wide range of interests and vocations in the next stage of their lives.

PE

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

Christopher Reeves Primary School recognises the value of Physical Education (P.E). We give every child the physical literacy, emotional and thinking skills to achieve in PE, Sport and life.

We fully adhere to the aims of the national curriculum for physical education to ensure that all pupils: develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities; are physically active for sustained periods of time; engage in competitive sports and activities; lead healthy, active lives and develop personal, social, cognitive, creative skills alongside physical and fitness.

Implementation

P.E. is taught at Christopher Reeves Primary School as an area of learning in its own right, as well as being integrated where possible with other curriculum areas.  Two sessions of PE per week are taught by all year groups, wherever possible.

PE is taught through a new scheme of work, REAL PE which delivers a unique, child-centred approach which transforms how we teach PE to engage and challenge every pupil, alongside Cambridgeshire Scheme of work to teach Gymnastics, Dance, Athletics and invasion games.
The key knowledge and skills of each topic are mapped across each year group. This ensures that pupils develop their knowledge of games, dance and gymnastics and (from KS2) athletics and outdoor and adventurous activity progressively. The skills in these areas are also therefore developed systematically, with the programme of study for each year group building on previous learning and preparing for subsequent years. Knowledge and skills are informed and linked to enable achievement of key stage end points, as informed by the 2014 National Curriculum.

We teach lessons so that pupils:

  • learn vital life skills including personal, social, cognitive, creative
  • develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and coordination, individually and with others.
  • engage in competitive (both against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations.
  • apply and develop a broad range of skills, learning how to use them in different ways and to link them to make actions and sequences of movement.
  • enjoy communicating, collaborating, supporting, challenging and competing with each other and other schools
  • develop an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports and learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success.

Some lessons are planned to incorporate physical activity in the classrooms or on the school grounds. Lessons are organised in incorporate community role models, such as sports coaches, with specialist skills. The varied curriculum is designed to enable all pupils to enjoy physical activity and to experience success in sport. Extra-curricular provision also provides further challenge and access to a range of physical activity. All pupils have the opportunity to participate in PE at their own level of development, with teachers ensuring that lessons cater for individual needs. Pupils keep a record of their own achievements and attainments in their own personal folder which follows them through the school to show the range of skills that they have adapted and a range of competitions that they have taken part in. In addition to this, pupils have their own PE diary to self-assess their own PE ability including individual targets. As well as securing and building on a range of skills, pupils develop knowledge of the basic rules of a range of games and activities. They experience positive competition and a string focus is placed on developing good sporting attitudes. Pupils learn in a safe environment and have a foundation for lifelong physical activity, leaving primary school as physically active.

Impact

Pupils complete each key stage with a high proficiency in each aspect of PE. Pupils are aware of the link between physical activity and good mental health and understand its significance as part of a healthy lifestyle.

History

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

History topics are informed by the national curriculum and are sensitive to children’s interests. The history curriculum at Christopher Reeves Primary is carefully planned and structured to ensure that current learning is linked to previous learning and that the school’s approaches are informed by current pedagogy. In line with the national curriculum 2014.

The curriculum at Christopher Reeves aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world which helps to stimulate pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past;
  • Are encouraged to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement;
  • Begin to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

Implementation

History is taught in blocks throughout the year, so that children achieve depth in their learning. The key knowledge and skills that children acquire and develop throughout each block have been mapped to ensure progression between year groups throughout the school. At the beginning of each new history topic, teachers refer to classroom timelines to develop children’s understanding of chronology. Each topic is introduced with reference to the chronology of previous topics (including those from previous years). The KWL strategy (What I Know, What I would like to know and what I have learnt) is used to check existing knowledge at the beginning of each history topic and this process informs a programme of study that is responsive to children’s interests. Key knowledge is reviewed by the children and checked and consolidated by the teacher. By the end of year 6, children will have a chronological understanding of British history from the Stone Age to the present day. They are able to draw comparisons and make connections between different time periods and their own lives. Interlinked with this are studies of world history, such as the ancient civilisations of Greece and the Egyptians.

Cross curricular outcomes in history are specifically planned for and these are indicated on the school’s progression mapping. The school’s own context is also considered, with opportunities for visits to places of historical interest and learning outside the classroom also identified and embedded in practice. Visits to the local area and use of local artefacts, such as the use of maps of the airfield and photographs of the American 92nd Bomber Command stationed in Podington during WWII, also support contextualised learning, as well as the acquisition of key knowledge and systematic development of key skills.

Planning is informed by and aligned with the National Curriculum. However, lesson design is not limited to this and teachers have the flexibility to plan for children’s interests. The history curriculum is designed to ensure appropriate diversity in the significant figures that children learn about. Teachers cater for the varying needs of all learners, differentiating activities where necessary and as appropriate, and ensuring an appropriate level of challenge. Outcomes of work are regularly monitored to ensure that they reflect a sound understanding of the key identified knowledge.
The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) follows the ‘Development Matters in the EYFS’ guidance which aims for all children in reception to have an ‘Understanding of the World; people and communities, the world and technology’ by the end of the academic year.

Impact

Outcomes in topic and English books evidence a broad and balanced history curriculum and demonstrate the children’s acquisition of identified key knowledge.
Emphasis is placed on analytical thinking and questioning and children demonstrate a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world, in addition to being curious to know more about the past. Through this study pupils ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement.

Geography

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

At Christopher Reeves Primary School we believe that Geography helps to provoke and provide answers to questions about the natural and human aspects of the world. Pupils are encouraged to develop a greater understanding and knowledge of the world, as well as their place in it.

The geography curriculum at Christopher Reeves Primary School enables pupils to develop knowledge and skills that are transferable to other curriculum areas and which can and are used to promote their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. Geography is, by nature, an investigative subject, which develops an understanding of concepts, knowledge and skills.

The curriculum is designed to ensure that teaching equips pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As pupils progress through the school, their growing knowledge about the world helps them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge and skills are progressive and are sequenced to provide the framework and approaches that provide explanation of how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time.

We seek to inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people which will remain with them for the rest of their lives, equipping them well for further education and beyond. Pupils incorporate a range of values within the school’s ethos when working with each other to support and challenge each other when undertaking geographical skills and develop their geographical knowledge.

Implementation

Geography at Christopher Reeves Primary school is taught on a two yearly cycle through topic work and linked to the English text. Teachers have identified the key knowledge and skills of geography within each topic and these are mapped across the school ensuring that knowledge builds progressively and that pupils develop skills systematically.

Existing knowledge is checked at the beginning of each topic, as part of the KWL strategy (What I know, What I would like to Know and What I have Learned). This ensures that teaching is informed by the pupil’s starting points and that it takes account of pupil voice, incorporating pupil’s interests. Knowledge organisers are given to pupils to support and develop pupils’ geographical understanding. Tasks are selected and designed to provide appropriate challenge to all learners, in line with the school’s commitment to inclusion. At the end of each topic, key words and knowledge is reviewed by the pupils and checked by the teacher and consolidated as necessary.

Cross curricular outcomes in geography are specifically planned for and these are indicated on the whole school Geography Knowledge and Skills Progression Map. The Geography provision is also well resourced and specific resources are mapped to specific year groups and topics to support effective teaching and learning. The local area is fully utilised to achieve the desired outcomes, with extensive opportunities for learning outside the classroom embedded in practice. Outdoor learning is paramount in pupil’s learning of geographical skills so they can adapt their knowledge to real life situations.

Impact

Outcomes in topic and English books, evidence a broad and balanced geography curriculum and demonstrate pupil’s acquisition of identified key knowledge relating to each of the identified national curriculum strands, as appropriate to key stage; locational knowledge, place knowledge and human and physical geography. This is in addition to the development and application of key skills, supported by fieldwork.
As pupils progress throughout the school, they develop a deep knowledge, understanding an appreciation of their local area and its place within the wider geographical context. Pupils learn about careers related to geography from members of the local and wider community, with specialist skills and knowledge (for example during science week) and this ensures that they are well prepared for the next steps of their education.

Art

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

Christopher Reeves primary school believes that art is a vital part of pupils’ education, with a significant and valuable role in the taught curriculum and the enrichment opportunities we offer our pupils. The art curriculum will develop children’s critical abilities, as well as an understanding of their own and others’ cultural heritages through the study of a diverse range of artists and artworks. Pupils will develop their understanding of the visual language of art with effective teaching and considered sequences of lessons and experiences. Understanding of the visual elements of art and design (line, tone, texture, colour, pattern, shape, 3D form) will be developed by providing a curriculum which will enable children to reach their full potential.

Implementation

The skills and knowledge that children will develop throughout each art topic are mapped across each year group and are progressive throughout the school. The emphasis on knowledge ensures that children understand the context of the artwork, as well as the artists that they are learning about and being inspired by. This enables links to other curriculum areas, including history, R.E. and geography, with children developing a considerable knowledge of individual artists, as well as individual works and art movements. A similar systematic approach to the development of artistic skills means that children are given opportunities to express their creative imagination, as well as practise and develop mastery in the key processes of art: drawing, painting, printing, textiles and sculpture. The school’s high-quality art curriculum is supported through the availability of a wide range of quality resources, which are used to support children’s confidence in the use of different media. The school’s rural locality is also utilised, with planned opportunities for learning outside the classroom, including sketching and watercolour painting of the natural environment and sculpture using natural resources. Forest school is also utilised and provides the opportunity for all pupils to participate in crafting activities, such as making: jewellery, whittling wands, mobiles and sculptures, all crafted from natural resources and providing the opportunity for pupils to use different materials and tools.

Impact

The structure of the art curriculum ensures that pupils are able to develop their knowledge and understanding of the work of artists, craftspeople and designers from a range of times and cultures and apply this knowledge to their own work. The consistent use of sketchbooks means that they are able to review, modify and develop their initial ideas in order to achieve high quality outcomes. Pupils learn to understand and apply the key principles of art: line, tone, texture, shape, form, space, pattern, colour, contrast, composition, proportion and perspective. The opportunity for pupils to refine and develop their techniques over time is supported by effective lesson sequencing and progression between classes. This also supports pupils in achieving age related expectations at the end of their cohort year.

Design Technology

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

Design and Technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. It encourages pupils to learn to think and intervene creatively to solve problems both as individuals and as members of a team. We encourage pupils to use their creativity and imagination, to design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. We aim to, wherever possible, link work to other disciplines such as mathematics, science, computing and art. The pupils are also given opportunities to reflect upon and evaluate past and present design technology, its uses and its effectiveness and are encouraged to become innovators and risk-takers.

Implementation

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, we teach the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in the process of designing and making for a purpose. The pupils design, create and evaluate products considering their function and purpose.

When designing and making, the children are taught to:

Design:

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.

Make:

  • select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing, as well as chopping and slicing) accurately.
  • select from and use a wider range of materials, ingredients and components, including construction materials, electronic components, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties, aesthetic qualities and, where appropriate, taste.

Evaluate:

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products.
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
  • understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world.

Technical knowledge:

  • apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.
  • understand and use mechanical systems in their products.
  • understand and use electrical systems in their products.
  • apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products
  • Understand some of the ways that food can be processed and the effect of different cooking practices.

Key skills and key knowledge for have been mapped across the school to ensure progression between classes within our thematic curriculum. The context for the children’s work is also considered and children learn about real life structures and the purpose of specific examples, as well as developing their skills throughout the programme of study.

Impact

We ensure pupils:

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users and critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook. Pupils will design and make a range of products and a good quality finish will be expected in all design and activities.

Pupils learn how to become courageous and take risks, learning from their mistakes and becoming resourceful and resilient when faced with challenges enabling them to become innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. They develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world and understand that high-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and wellbeing of the nation.

PSHE

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

In line with the National Curriculum 2014, all schools must provide a curriculum that is broadly based, balanced and meets the needs of all pupils. Under section 78 of the Education Act 2002, a PSHE curriculum:

  • Promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the school and of society, and
  • Prepares pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life.

Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) is lifelong learning about relationships, emotions, looking after ourselves, different families, sex, sexuality and sexual health. It involves acquiring information, developing skills and forming positive beliefs, values and attitudes. It has a key part to play in the personal, social, moral and spiritual development of young people.


The National Curriculum advises schools to make provision for personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE). At Christopher Reeves Primary School, PSHE is considered across the curriculum and is a fundamental part of the pupil’s school experience. In maths, pupils are taught the importance of a growth mindset which supports their self-belief, resilience, perseverance and success across the wider curriculum and in social contexts. In Geography and History, pupils learn the significance of their local area and key figures from within it, with the outdoor school environment supporting and enhancing the learning. Personal, Social, Health Education is taught explicitly as part of the whole-school approach. We believe that successful PSHE supports pupil’s learning capacity, promotes wellbeing and underpins pupil’s development as young people in society.


To support our aims, the school is a member of the DfE funded PSHE association. Our PSHE curriculum offers a comprehensive, carefully thought-through Scheme of Work which brings consistency and progression to our pupil’s learning in this vital curriculum area. Our approach also supports the “Personal Development” and “Behaviour and Attitude” aspects required under the Ofsted Inspection Framework, as well as significantly contributing to the school’s Safeguarding and Equality Duties, the Government’s British Values agenda and the SMSC (Spiritual, Moral, Social, Cultural) development opportunities provided for our pupils.

We aim to ensure that all pupils:

  • Develop confidence and responsibility and to make the most of their abilities
  • Prepare to play an active role as citizens in Britain.
  • Develop a healthy, safer lifestyles.
  • Develop good relationships and to understand and celebrate the differences between people.

The aims of relationship and sex education (RSE) at our school are to:

  • Provide a framework in which sensitive discussions can take place.
  • Teach children the correct vocabulary to describe themselves and their bodies.
  • Develop confidence in talking about feelings and relationships.
  • Help children develop feelings of self-respect, confidence and empathy.
  • Have the confidence and self-esteem to value themselves and others.
  • Prepare children for puberty, and give them an understanding of sexual development and the importance of health and hygiene.
  • Create a positive culture around issues of relationships and sexuality.
  • Understand about the diverse range of different relationships, and families, and their importance for the care and support of children.
  • Behave responsibly within relationships.
  • Be able to recognise unsafe situations and be able to protect themselves and ask for help and support.
  • Understand the role of the media in forming attitudes.

Implementation

The PSHE Association’s programme of study covers all areas of PSHE for the primary phase including statutory Relationships and Health Education.

At Christopher Reeves Primary School, PSHE lessons are taught every week throughout the school. This ensures that we are able to teach the PSHE knowledge and skills in a developmental and age-appropriate way.
These lessons are reinforced and enhanced in many ways which include:

  • Praise and reward systems
    Forest School activities
  • Positive relationships within the whole school community.

We aim to ‘live’ what is learnt and apply it to everyday situations in the school community. The school’s ethos, curriculum design and PSHE lesson coverage promote the following:

  • Empathy and compassion (including impact on decision-making and behaviour)
  • Respect for others’ right to their own beliefs, values and opinions
  • Sensitivity in evaluating the arguments and opinions of others
  • Skills for employability, including Active listening and communication (including assertiveness skills)
  • Team working
  • Negotiation (including flexibility, self-advocacy and compromise within an awareness of personal boundaries)
  • Leadership skills
  • Presentation skills
  • Enterprise skills and attributes (e.g. aspiration, creativity, goal setting, identifying opportunities, taking positive risks)
  • Recognising, evaluating and utilising strategies for managing influence
  • Valuing and respecting diversity
  • Using these skills and attributes to build and maintain healthy relationships of all kinds.


In each curriculum area, consideration is given to the school’s own context to ensure that learning experiences are meaningful and relevant. Learning experiences themselves are also varied and opportunities for learning outside the classroom are also valued, considered and specifically planned for using our Forest School area within the school grounds. Pupils are provided with opportunities to take pride in and ownership of the school grounds, making use of the Sensory Garden and Wild Area.

The school’s celebration of the annual ‘Pupil’s Mental Health Week’ also raises awareness and compliments the school’s commitment to promoting good mental health.

Impact

The school has established and maintained a positive learning environment where the pupils have positive relationships with their peers and teachers. The school works hard in promoting global citizenship, which itself is supported through an ongoing collaboration with a partner school in Kenya. With weekly assemblies, we ensure that PSHE remains a constant and relevant part of each pupil’s education.
 

We regularly maintain up to date training which the subject co-ordinator disseminates to ensure an approach that is informed by current pedagogy and advice from experts, as well as involving the use of recommended resources.

The school also has a qualified Mental Health First Aider, ensuring there is a whole school approach to mental health and emotional well-being.

Music

Embed – Knowledge and skills into long term memory

Enrich – Pupils’ vocabulary and life experiences through outdoor education

Empower – Pupils to become effective and lifelong readers and learners

Intent

The National Curriculum for music aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Perform, listen to, review and evaluate music
  • Be taught to sing, create and compose music
  • Understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated.

At Christopher Reeves Primary the intention is that children gain a firm understanding of what music is through listening, singing, playing, evaluating, analysing, and composing across a wide variety of historical periods, styles, traditions, and musical genres. Our objective is to develop a curiosity for the subject, as well as an understanding and acceptance of the validity and importance of all types of music, and respect for the role that music may wish to be expressed in any person’s life. We are committed to ensuring children understand the value and importance of music in the wider community, and are able to use their musical skills, knowledge, and experiences to involve themselves in music, in a variety of different contexts.

Implementation

The music curriculum at our school, ensures students sing, listen, play, perform and evaluate. This is embedded in classroom activities as well as the weekly singing assemblies, various concerts and performances, the learning of instruments, and joining in with extra curricula clubs such as ukulele club or guitar club.

The elements of music are taught across the school, through the structured Charanga programme which we subscribe to, as well as using lots of other resources including Sing Up and songs, games and rhymes from Active Music.

Children are taught to play the recorder in Year 2 and the ukulele in Year 3 or Year 4. In Years 5 and 6, we take up the Music For Bedford Borough offer of learning to play an instrument as a whole class, for example, samba band, class band, p-Bones (plastic trombones). In doing so children begin to understand the different principles of each method of creating notes, as well as how to read basic music notation.

As a church school, the children perform at St Mary’s church at regular points during the year. There are opportunities for the guitar group to accompany hymns and the string players to perform carols at the Christmas service.

Outdoor, or Forest Worship, as we have named it, is a wonderful way for the children to connect with the natural world and enjoy singing and playing in the school grounds and the nearby Millennium Wood.

Music Unwrapped and Bedford Sing-On are opportunities for our small school to experience music making with a large number of people from diverse backgrounds.

Impact

In gaining the Music Mark award, Christopher Reeves Primary has been recognised as giving children a wide range of musical experiences whilst allowing students to discover areas of strength, as well as areas they might like to improve upon. The integral nature of music and the learner creates an enormously rich palette from which a student may access fundamental abilities such as: achievement, self-confidence, interaction with and awareness of others, and self-reflection. Music will also develop an understanding of culture and history, both in relation to students individually, as well as ethnicities from across the world. Children are able to enjoy music, in as many ways as they choose - either as listener, creator or performer. They can analyse music and comprehend its parts. They can sing and feel a pulse. Music is of huge benefit to the mental well-being of our whole school community. 

Modern Foreign Languages

Accordion content

The progression of skills and knowledge for each of these subjects can be found here:

English

Maths

Science

Religious Education

Computing

PE

History

Geography

Art

Design Technology

PSHE

Music

Modern Foreign Languages

 

Phonics and Reading

At Christopher Reeves Primary School we follow the DfE 'Letters and Sounds: Principles and Practice of High Quality Phonics' which separates the phonics the children need to acquire into six Phases.

A copy of the Letters and Sounds Publication is available to download on this page, this contains more detailed information.

Phase 1

This phase is largely linked to the Early Years Foundation Stage Profile and the Communication, Language and Learning area of learning.

The areas covered by Phase 1 include:

  • General Sound Discrimination - environmental sounds
  • General Sound Discrimination - Instrumental sounds
  • General Sound Discrimination - Body Percussion
  • Rhythm and rhyme
  • Alliteration
  • Voice Sounds
  • Oral Blending and segmenting

Phase 2

This phase is started when children have experienced a wide variety of listening activities, including songs, stories and rhymes. This phase teaches 19 letters and moves children on from oral blending and segmenting to blending and segmenting with letters. Children will also be taught to read VC (Vowel/consonant words e.g. it) and CVC (Consonant, vowel, consonant words e.g. cat)

Children are also introduced to 2 syllable words and captions. This phase also includes a selection of 'tricky' words which are also called high frequency words and are not phonetically readable, meaning that children need to learn them off by heart.

Letter Progression in Phase 2:

Set 1:  s, a, t, p       Set 2:  i, n, m, d       Set 3:  g, o, c, k      Set 4: ck, e, u, r    Set 5:  h, b, f, ff, l, ll, ss

Phase 3

The purpose of this phase is to teach another 25 graphemes (written representations of a sound), most of them comprising of two letters e.g. oa. Children will also continue to practise CVC blending and segmentation, extend their learning by spelling two and multi-syllable words. Children will also learn the letter names during this phase and also an increased range of tricky words, (Including the First 100 High Frequency words) and moving to the next 200 when ready -  both in sight reading and also spelling.

The Phase begins with:

Set 6: j, v, w, x     Set 7: y, z, zz, qu

and is followed by:

Graphemes Sample words Graphemes Sample Words
ch chip ar farm
sh shop or for
th thin / then ur hurt
ng ring ow cow
ai rain oi coin
ee feet ear dear
igh night air fair
oa boat ure sure
oo boot / look er corner

Phase 4

When children enter Phase 4 they should be able to represent each of the 42 phonemes by a grapheme and be able to blend phonemes to read CVC words and segment CVC words for spelling. This phase is one of consolidation and focuses on words which contain adjacent consonants and practising blending for reading and segmenting for spelling.

This is a short phase which does not introduce new sounds - at Christopher Reeves Primary, we teach Phase four alongside Phase 5 to ensure progression and challenge.

Phase 5

The purpose of this phase is for children to broaden their knowledge of graphemes and phonemes for use in reading and spelling. They will learn new graphemes and alternative pronunciations for these and graphemes they already know. Children become quicker at recognising graphemes of more than one letter in words and at blending the phonemes they represent.

The aim of Phase 5 is to make automatic the reading of all words - decodable and tricky.

New Graphemes for Reading:

 

 

Graphemes

ay (day)

ph (photo)

ou (out)

ew (new)

it (tie)

oe (toe)

ea (eat)

au (Paul)

oy (boy)

a-e (make)

ir (girl)

e-e (these)

ue (blue)

i-e (like)

as (saw)

o-e (home)

wh (when)

u-e (rule)

 

Alternative pronunciation of graphemes:

 

Graphemes

i (fin, find)

a (hat, what)

o (hot, cold)

y (yes, by, very)

c (cat, cent)

ch (chin, school, chef)

g (got, giant)

ou (out, shoulder, could, you)

u (but, put, south) 

ow (cow, blow) 

ie (tie, field) 

ea (eat, bread) 

er (farmer, her) 

Children working at Phase 5 will also work on reading and spelling two-syllable and three-syllable words. The emphasis on spelling increases in Phase 5 in readiness for Phase 6 and increased standards / expectations in Year 2 when children are expected to be able to spell 'many' of the Common Exception words.

Phase 6

At this stage children will be reading much longer pieces and decoding at a much faster speed. Children will be reading automatically and using phonics more independently to decode. Children's spelling should be phonemically accurate although will still be unconventional at times.

The aim for Phase 6 is that children will become fluent readers and increasingly accurate spellers.

At Christopher Reeves Primary, we teach Phase 6 to our able Year 1 children and then into Year 2 where the Phase 6 content combines with the National Curriculum guidelines for 'Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation' (SPaG)

Phase 6 includes:

  • Past tense
  • Investigating and learning to add suffixes (-ed, -ing, -er, -est, -ful, -ly and -y, -s, -es, -en, -ment, -ness)
  • Teaching spelling of long words
  • Finding and learning the difficult bits in words
  • Learning and practising spellings - memory strategies
  • Applying spelling in writing
  • Knowledge of the spelling system

Letters_and_Sounds_-_DFES-00281-2007

Our Reading Scheme

The reading scheme we have at Christopher Reeves Primary begins in Foundation Stage with children being provided with books which link directly to the phase of Phonics that they are learning about. Children work through the phases in a particular order, gradually learning new sounds in a sequence of lessons. These sounds link to the children's writing, with children being taught to write the grapheme as they learn the sounds.

This is a very successful strategy which we complement by giving children books aimed at the phase they are working on. The books gradually increase in difficulty as the children increase their knowledge of phonics. Once children are reading fluently and are confidently using many of the Phase 5 sounds, they move onto the main school reading scheme. The main school scheme is made up of many commercially purchased schemes, with a wide variety of text types, genres and a mixture of fiction and non-fiction.

Some children will have a main scheme book and also a phonics focused book to ensure they are reading at the level which is appropriate for them. Each child has an individual program to follow and is moved to the next colour band when they are ready.

We also provide all children with a library book to read alongside the reading scheme book. This is to give children the chance to choose their own books and also to give something for parents to share with children at home. It is very important that children are read to, to develop their knowledge of texts, vocabulary and to access stories and books which would be too hard for them to read to themselves.

Our reading scheme follows the 'Book Bands' system, which is widely used by Primary Schools to sort texts by their level of difficulty. The order of the colour bands is as follows:

Lilac (non-word), Pink, Red, Yellow, Blue, Green, Orange, Turquoise, Purple, Gold, White, Lime.

The document below goes in to this in more detail, explaining which colours are expected for each year group.

The following link is an information pamphlet to help support your child with reading: